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A First Class Client Process - part 2 of 1 2 3

Published 01/01/2009

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The next point of reinforcement may be a letter that you send out with your brochure and information pack confirming the discussions you have had and giving them further information, again this letter should include a reference to prices and products, it could be in the form of a simple price guide which says:

Framed images available from £xx to £yy
Contemporary canvas images available from £xx to £yy
Collections of images in storybook albums from £xx upwards

The constant reference to products and prices at every stage is designed to ensure that the client never reaches the sales department unprepared and is in for a nasty shock when faced with the prices.


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The photographic experience with you is your next opportunity to again talk about the 'end product'. Encourage your clients throughout the session to consider the final destination for the images. The benefit of shooting on location in and around the client's home as opposed to in a studio is that you can consider designing specific images for certain locations in the home, even during the shoot, choosing clothing and accessories to wear in the images which will complement colour schemes and interior design. Introducing concepts like this and engaging the client in the creative process is almost guaranteeing a sale even before the image is in the camera. By the time you have completed your photographic session, invest time to have a final coffee with the client; by now you have developed a great rapport with your clients, they have had a fun experience with you and are relaxed and comfortable in your company. This is another opportunity, if it feels appropriate to encourage them to think about what they might want. Explain to them how the sales process unfolds and, if you are going to do the sale in their home prepare them for the visit, explain the equipment you are bringing and decide together which room would be best to do the viewing in. In your explanation of the sales experience tell them that you will take them through the images in a structured way that helps them to select their favourites to go either in frames or on canvas for the wall or as a collection in an album. If at this point they are unsure what your albums are like, you have the opportunity to show them ("I just happen to have one in the car - would you like to have a look now?") Always go to your photographic shoots prepared, take a couple of sample products with you. They may never make it out of the car but you may be missing another opportunity to plant some seeds with the client about the final presentation of their own images. The more preparation is done prior to the sale itself, the easier the process will be.

The next key to a successful sale lies in the sale samples you have. The trigger will always be your sales tools themselves and this is a crucial investment to make. People buy what they see so you need to create some fabulous 'wow' factor samples - you are now in retail and are competing with the high street, you have to do it better, with sleeker sales tools and smarter products. Your sample album should be laid out in a beautiful storybook format and should have in optimum number of images - clients will ask how many images are in this album - then they will gauge the number of images they put in their album by how your sample album looks. Never have the minimum amount of images in it, never have an album so big it puts people off, 60-90 images in a lifestyle album is ideal. Popular sales products are still images on canvas, multi- and single-framed images and images on acrylic. Always keep an eye on current trends in interiors, there is a huge resurgence of bold and elaborately patterned wallpaper. Have a look at the range of wall products you supply, have you any products that would sit comfortably against these heavily patterned papers? If not, you may need to source something to add to your range, ditto a range of frames that complement neutral minimalist tones and interiors, vibrant Morrocan-inspired colour schemes or eclectic country retreats. You need to be confident that you have access to products that will fit in a whole range of different interiors.


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1st Published 01/01/2009
last update 06/11/2019 11:05:57

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